Archive for the 'race' Category

18
Dec
07

Self-esteem and young black girls

Louisiana Weekly – WASHINGTON (NNPA) – The Naomi Campbells and Tyra Banks – super models of the world – have no problems with gracing the catwalks of Milan and Paris with utmost confidence. Yet, many African-American girls are not able to even walk the halls of their schools with the same aura.

“I think it’s been an issue way before the 21st century, certainly for our ancestors,” says Angela Clay, author of the new book, “Loving the Me I See.”

The publication targets young girls everywhere, seeking to motivate and inspire females to maintain a healthy level of self-esteem.

Victoria Reese, a junior legal communications major at Howard University, and the youngest of three sisters, describes self-esteem as “an inner air about oneself that exudes confidence.”

KidsHealth, a website devoted to health issues for parents, children, and teens, claims that “self-esteem is the collection of beliefs or feelings that we have about ourselves, or our ‘self-perceptions.””

On the other hand, low self-esteem is the exact opposite, and the numbers underscore the truth.

According to studies in 2005 and 2006 by the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty, “92 percent of teen girls would like to change something about the way they look, with body weight ranking the highest.”

Clay says, “When I think of low self esteem, I think of a lack of self respect, a lack of self worth, not being able to see yourself as God created you to be.”

A motivational speaker and Bible class teacher, Clay laments that so many young women are “looking in the mirror and not loving what you see.”

In addition, other signs of low self-esteem are an unwillingness to try new things, a tendency to speak down about oneself, a low tolerance for frustration, an overly critical attitude, and easy disappointment, according to KidsHealth.

When it comes to African-American girls, there are several factors that could be contributing to the issue. In many instances, girls “believe what someone has told them over the years,” says Clay.

She notes that African-American women have dealt with their self-esteem for decades.

“We believed that my hair is better than your hair,” she points to stigmas that have been planted within the Black community since slavery, such as lighter or darker skin.

Even today, Clay struggles with those same features that are accepted within mainstream society. “Being an African-American woman, I wear my hair in its natural state, and African-American people look at me as if they were born without natural hair,” she says.

Other societal factors also play a role.

“Certainly the media plays a role in it. What we have to understand as a people is whatever we allow to saturate in our minds is what’s going to come out of our mouths,” says Clay.

Reese agrees.

“Media plays a monumental role on the self-esteem of young African-American girls today…Things such as music videos, commercials, unrealistic model shows, etc.,” she says.

The Dove study also found that “75 percent of teenage girls felt ‘depressed, guilty and shameful’ after spending just three minutes leafing through a fashion magazine.”

Many issues that plague teens as a whole have been linked to low self-esteem. The National Association for Self-Esteem, an organization that aims to “integrate self-esteem into the fabric of American society” states, “a close relationship has been documented between low self-esteem and such problems as violence, alcoholism, drug abuse, eating disorders, school dropouts, teenage pregnancy, suicide, and low academic achievement.”

However, Clay notes, “the apple ‘don’t’ fall too far from the tree.”

She stresses that nurturing from parents must begin when a child is born. Whether it is reading bedtime stories or listening to classical music, “once the baby comes out of the womb, they only know what they see,” she said.

This support is necessary until about the third grade because when the child hits fifth grade he or she is vulnerable and begins seeking the right direction, says Clay. From that point on, Clay says, parents must be extra-cognizant of their own self-esteem as well.

Clay recommends that parents “take time to sit down and understand” their own self-image so that they can then work to set an example for their child.

Having too older sisters, Reese says positive role models are also a must. “The solution that I would propose would be for young African-American girls to learn more about motivational Black women who they can look up to,” she says.

Overall, Clay believes that the African-American community as a whole still has a lot of work to do. She says, “Until we come to grips with our natural beauty, we’ll be plagued for quite some time.”

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05
Sep
07

Procter & Gamble Unveils ‘My Black Is Beautiful’

CNNMoney reports…P&G/ ESSENCE Poll Reveals Overwhelming Majority of African American Women Say They are Portrayed ‘Worse’ than Other Racial Groups in the Media – P&G Elicits Support from More than 3,000 Journalists, Business and Community Leaders During 2007 National Association of Black Journalists Convention

The Procter & Gamble Company announced the launch of “My Black is Beautiful,” a program designed to ignite and support a sustained national conversation by, for and about black women. The initiative was created to serve as the catalyst for a movement that affects positive change in the way African American women are reflected in popular culture.

Results from a P&G/ ESSENCE poll show that 77 percent of African American women are “concerned” about the way they are portrayed in popular media. The vast majority, 71 percent, say they are portrayed “worse” than other racial groups in the media. Sixty-nine percent of respondents said that teens are negatively influenced by those images.

Recognizing that beauty and self-confidence are intrinsically linked, P&G will introduce “My Black is Beautiful” and release the results of the consumer survey during National Association of Black Journalists Convention (NABJ), slated for Aug. 8-12, 2007 in Las Vegas.

“‘My Black is Beautiful’ is a celebration of the personal and collective beauty of African American women and encourages them to define and promote a beauty standard that is an authentic reflection of their spirit,” said Najoh Tita Reid, P&G Multicultural Marketing Director. “We not only celebrate our own awesome beauty, but we want to empower black women to challenge those who would see or portray us otherwise.”

Key components under development include a multi-city “My Black is Beautiful” Conversation Tour and the release of a discussion guide to encourage women to facilitate or participate in a conversation cluster in their local communities. Consumers can learn about the campaign and access the booklet online at http://www.myblackisbeautiful.com, and at select retail stores and in national magazines.

Additionally, P&G has created a “My Black is Beautiful” community trust fund. P&G will continue to issue action grants to community-based organizations dedicated to the health, education and empowerment of African American young women. A grant of $50,000, underwritten by Tampax and Always, will be awarded to and shared by the W.E.B. Dubois Society, GirlSpirit-Women Song Inc. and Urban Academy in June.

“Over our 37 year history, ESSENCE has embodied the strength and beauty of African American women,” said Michelle Ebanks, President, Essence Communications Inc. “We proudly stand with P&G as they invite women across the country to come together in their homes, libraries, community centers, schools and churches to share their perspectives on the issues that are important to us.”

The integrated, multi-brand initiative is supported by Pantene Pro-V Relaxed & Natural, Cover Girl Queen Collection, Olay Definity, Crest, Secret, Tampax and Always brands and will be sustained through comprehensive brand communications, including public relations, advertising, retail promotions, event marketing and grassroots efforts.

20
Aug
07

Steatopygia: The big booty disease

steFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Steatopygia, is a high degree of fat accumulation in and around the buttocks. The deposit of fat is not confined to the gluteal regions, but extends to the outside and front of the thighs, forming a thick layer reaching sometimes to the knee.

This development constitutes a genetic characteristic of the Khoisan. It is specially a feature of the women, but it occurs in a lesser degree in the males (in most genetic variations of Homo sapiens, females tend to exhibit a greater propensity to adipose tissue accumulation in the buttock region as compared with males). It has also been noted among the Pygmies of Central Africa and the Onge-tribe of the Andaman Islands. Among the Khoisan, it is regarded as a sign of beauty: it begins in infancy and is fully developed by the time of the first pregnancy. It is often accompanied by the formation known as elongated labia (labia minora that may extend as much as 4 inches outside the vulva).

What seems certain is that steatopygia in both sexes was fairly widespread among early human populations. The discovery in the caves of the south of France of figures in ivory presenting a remarkable development of the thighs, and even the peculiar prolongation of the nymphae, has been used to support this theory[citation needed]. However, the type of Neolithic Venus figurines sometimes referred to as “steatopygian Venus” do not strictly qualify as steatopygian, since they exhibit an angle of approximately 120 degrees between the back and the buttocks, while steatopygia strictly speaking is diagnosed at an angle of about 90 degrees only (Passemard 1938).

31
Jul
07

Becky aka Buckwild…your ghetto pass is revoked for this mess!

What kind of slave auction ass, sudo-dating game mess is this. Potential Negro #1, Potential Negro #2…WTF. What white person in their right mind is going to play a dating game called “Know the Negro” and not realize that someone might be offended? I’m going to need Mo’Nique, Shay, and the chick who’s hair looked like fire and the rest of the african americans who were on Flavor of Love and Charm School to check this chick. For real.

Know the Negro…know that negroes aren’t going to be feeling this. Come on people…wake up. This is what happens when you let white folks get a little to familar with you. They can’t tell offensive stuff from fun stuff. We have to educate Whitey. It’s the only way they will learn. For the brothers who called in to the show to be the negros…damn…you know better than that man. You guys are encouraging this.

Becky aka Buckwild…do not pass GO, don’t collect $200, no more black dick for you…your hood pass is revoked. “Kick Rocks!”

Cowhead Show on 102.5, take the hoods off and listen a min. I don’t even have words to express how ignorant you are. However, I’m sure you’ll get many letters and calls from people who do have the words. Enjoy the free publicity while it lasts, bitches! Just because you are in a picture with a “negro” doesn’t mean shit to me. You know only a black radio show could have possibly gotten away with this…you can’t. Sure sure, it’s not fair and equal, but neither is racism.

19
Jun
07

Am I supposed to believe Angelina Joile is a black woman?

A Mighty Heart…A mighty damn shame. This is where beauty and celebrity cause blindness. Who the hell cast Angelina Joile as a bi-racial french woman? What kind of blackface bullshit is this. I mean I know she’s got a sista’s lips (cosmetically enhanced or natural…who cares) and she’s a lil tanner in the movie but don’tHalle and Thandie look more like this woman (widow of murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl) >>>>

mpearl2.jpg

you mean to tell me that no bi-racial actresses fit the bill? I like Angelina. She’s cool, global, and very beautiful…but damn hollywood, you could have done better than this. She looks like a while woman with very very curly hair. I don’t see a biracial woman in the commercials for the movie. I see a white woman. Even an unknown actress would have been better. Then I might have been able to push past the fact that I see this white woman every five seconds on E!, in various tabloids when I’m at the store, etc. She’s too recognizable.